Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Many demographic changes are taking place, with the Baby Boomers, a large generation, retiring, and Generation Y, a larger generation than the Baby Boomers, consuming at record levels.  Join Jason Hartman and demographer, Ken Gronbach, as they discuss this upcoming “storm.” 

Ken describes Generation Y as an exciting generation, where the United States is the only country with this large of a group at the present time, and that it is very important that businesses recognize and anticipate their markets as Generation Y grows up. Generation X is more of a mystery generation because of its smaller size, which makes it less of a valuable market.  Ken believes that the United States’ best days are ahead as people bail out of the European Union. He also believes that China’s economic future is bleak due to artificial tampering with the population, with demographic numbers showing China in trouble economically within ten years, struggling to feed themselves within 15 years.

Ken shows how the housing market is being held hostage by big bank foreclosures and why this log jam will soon correct and precipitate a restoration of the United States economy. Ken also talks about how manufacturing will return to the United States with a vengeance because the United States is the only industrialized nation with a huge young highly skilled workforce.

Direct download: cw-249-KenGronbach.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 12:40pm EST

Join Jason Hartman as he opens with some thoughts on buying far below construction or replacement costs sharing an email from Allstate Insurance, then a discussion of an Orange County Register article citing Marcus & Millichap's 2012 National Apartment Report. You'll hear Michael LeBeouf, author of the NY Times best-selling book, "The Greatest Management Principle in the World", where he discusses human behavior and how "What Gets Rewarded, Gets Repeated." In the news: Underwater borrowers eligible for settlement write-downs.

A calculation by a Brookings Institution economist narrowed down a pool of underwater homeowners to 500,000 who could qualify for principal reduction from the $25 billion mortgage settlement. Using the parameters of the settlement, Ted Gayer found just 5% of the nation's 11.1 million underwater borrowers could get the principal reduced on their mortgage, first reported by The Washington Post.

About $10 billion of the settlement, in the form of credits, will go toward principal write-downs made by the five banks. Only homeowners delinquent on their mortgages are eligible. Gayer eliminated others according to underlying requirements, including Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac loans and homes not owner-occupied. It's a rough calculation, Gayer warned, and he made some assumptions in the process. He eliminated any loans not held on the banks' balance sheets, as well as any with a second loan. Mortgage bondholders may not take kindly to principal write-downs, he said.

Direct download: cw-248-David.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 1:27pm EST

Whether you’re trying to get a raise at your job, solve a relationship problem, or deal with a stubborn child, negotiating is a daily part of our lives, and every human interaction is affected by emotion and logic or rationalization. Jason Hartman interviews Stuart Diamond, the author of "Getting More: How to Negotiate to Achieve Your Goals in the Real World" on improving negotiating skills and interactions with others in order to “get more.” Stuart stresses the importance of making the human connection and finding the pictures in people’s heads, knowing them better in order to better meet their needs, which gives a person a more competitive edge and adds tremendous wealth to any deal.  

Emotions play a huge part in all interactions. “Emotions destroy negotiations because they distract people from their goals,” says Stuart. When people get emotional, they stop listening, and it becomes a priority to find out a person’s emotional temperature before proceeding on any deal. Stuart talks about key points in how people should treat one another, stating how people today have a lack of trust in one another and have a tendency to demonize one another rather than using simple solutions to solve conflicts. “Fighting is the last choice; not the first choice,” explains Stuart.

Stuart Diamond has taught and advised on negotiation and cultural diversity to corporate and government leaders in more than 40 countries, including in Eastern Europe, former Soviet Republics, China, Latin America, the Middle East, Canada, South Africa and the United States. He holds an M.B.A. with honors from Wharton Business School, ranked #1 globally by The Financial Times where he is currently a professor from practice. For more than 90% of the semesters over the past 15 years his negotiation course has been the most popular in the school based on the course auction, and he has won multiple teaching awards. He has taught negotiation at Harvard Law School, from which he holds a law degree and is a former Associate Director of the Harvard Negotiation Project. He has directed a negotiation consulting firm in Cambridge, MA.

Direct download: cw-247-StuartDiamond.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 6:15pm EST

Broadcasting from Washington DC, Jason Hartman interviews financial planner, Randy Luebke on an amazing client case study of how Jason and Randy helped a client turn one property into a sizable, diversified, high cash-flow income property portfolio that will create a lasting legacy for generations to come. You'll learn more about the 1031 tax-deferred exchange strategy and much more.

Prior to the case study, Jason addresses various current events including; the gold house price ratio, why you should not be investing in foreign markets like Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Belize, Panama, etc., median priced housing at the highest affordability since 1971, the year Richard Nixon took us off the gold standard completely creating fiat money devaluation and massive price inflation and several other issues.

Direct download: cw-246-RandyL.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 10:32am EST

Jason Hartman interviews author, Amity Shlaes, about her book, “The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression.” Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke of the forgotten man as the man at the bottom of the economic pyramid, the poor man, the homeless man. Miss Shlaes explains that there is another forgotten man, the taxpayer, based on an algebraic description by William Graham Sumner.

Jason and Miss Shlaes explore the concept that the Great Depression was man-made, that the Federal government suppressed the economy and the markets, which slowed recovery. A zombie-like economy has ensued in America, very similar to what happened with Japan’s economic downfall, which is still recovering two decades later. Miss Shlaes also shares how the collective or community aspect, particularly farms, encouraged and funded by the government, did not work because of bad stewardship – nobody cared about anything because nobody owned anything.

In order for people to care and succeed, they must be allowed to own property, own businesses, and own their homes. Amity Shlaes and Jason move on to discuss “The Greedy Hand,” as it refers to taxation. As Miss Shlaes researched the history of The Greedy Hand, she found that Americans initially resisted tax withholding, that it was not just accepted.

Over time, taxation has become extremely complex, and the best solution would be to simplify it again. Miss Shlaes also shares her predictions on inflation for 2012. She encourages people to read, to educate themselves and their children. Amity Shlaes is a syndicated columnist for Bloomberg and a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. In addition to writing on political economy, she writes on taxes. She is a contributor to Marketplace, the public radio show.

She has appeared on numerous radio and television shows over the years. Miss Shlaes was formerly a columnist for the Financial Times and, before that a member of the editorial board of the Wall Street Journal, specializing in economics. In the early 1990s she served as the Journal's features, or "op ed" editor. Prior to that, she followed the collapse of communism for the Wall Street Journal/Europe. Over the years she has published in the National Review, the New Republic, Foreign Affairs (on the German economy), the American Spectator, the Suddeutsche Zeitung and Die Zeit. In 2002, she contributed an article on the US tax code to the thirtieth anniversary anthology of Tax Notes, the scholarly journal.

Miss Shlaes has twice been a finalist for the Loeb Prize in commentary, her field's best known prize. In 2002, she was co-winner of the Frederic Bastiat Prize, an international prize for writing on political economy. In 2003, she spent several months at the American Academy in Berlin as the JP Morgan Fellow for finance and economy.

Direct download: cw-245-AmityShlaes.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 11:00am EST

Join Jason Hartman and client, Patrick, for a timely discussion about the benefits of real estate investing. Patrick shares his experiences working with Jason Hartman and Platinum Properties Investor Network’s investment counselors.

Patrick tells younger people, “If you can have ten houses by the time you’re 30, you’ll be set when you’re 60.” Staying power – a buy-and-hold philosophy – is the key to successful real estate investing. Patrick and Jason talk about the importance of having all of the facts about local markets before purchasing a property so that the property makes sense the day you buy it.

Due diligence includes such factors as property taxes, employment, location to schools and shopping centers, crime rate, and in- and out-migration from an area, just to name a few. Patrick talks about the downside of speculating on properties, using his own experience with a rental home in California as an example, and encourages due diligence and diversification. The current economy is producing a larger number of tenants as more and more homeowners are forced out of their homes through foreclosures. This is creating a larger market for rental property, but not all markets are viable.

Jason and Patrick also discuss the importance of going where the customers are going to have the easiest time and a good experience, rather than being loyal to a market that is no longer providing a good return. Jason is a firm believer that the investment has to work in real life, not just on paper. In the latter portion of the show, Patrick discusses the pros and cons of a college education and how true learning takes place in the real world.

Direct download: cw-244-Pat.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 11:42am EST

Jason Hartman interviews author, former Wall Street senior banker, and best-selling investigative journalist, William (Bill) D. Cohan on the events that led up to the current economic crisis. Bill explains the choices that the big firms, such as Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, etc, made regarding what type of institution they were going to be, the path of these firms that led up to the current crisis, and how they used the bailout money gifted to them. He said it was one big party on Wall Street, during which brokers were to bring in revenue using a lot of whacky products, until everything came crashing down. Huge bonuses were paid out from the revenue collected from unsuspecting clients.

Bill and Jason also discuss the Occupy Wall Street Movement. Bill expressed disappointment in the message of the movement, saying it isn’t clear and they need to learn how Wall Street really works so that they can be more effective in bringing about reform. Wall Street has been influencing what goes on in Washington and paying lobbyists and donating to congressional coffers so that they can get the regulations, or lack thereof, that they want, i.e. the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. Bill talks about how the expansion of Wall Street into Middle Class America was not an accident, using the example of Merrill Lynch being a public company. This ultimately led to broken trust between Wall Street and Main Street, as people have now shied away from risk taking.

To solve the problems, Bill suggests changing the incentive system on Wall Street, in that it can no longer be okay to take huge risks with people’s money or get paid big bonuses whether they lose money for the firms or not, as well as going back to having to use their partner’s capital to operate. William D. Cohan offers audiences a unique, close-up perspective of the greatest financial crisis since the Great Depression. He combines deep knowledge of the investment banking world with the fine storytelling skills of an award-winning investigative journalist.

Bill’s new book is titled Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came To Rule The World, a revelatory history of Goldman Sachs. His previous book, House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street, lays out in gory detail how the financial crisis began with the collapses of Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers. The Last Tycoons: The Secret History of Lazard Frères & Co. won the 2007 Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award for its candid revelations about how Wall Street works.

Direct download: cw-243-WilliamCohan.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 10:17am EST

Join Jason Hartman and returning guest, Ellen Brown, author of Web of Debt, for a discussion of the United States’ debt ceiling, QE2, inflation, as well as a brief explanation of how money came to equal debt. Ellen explains why the debt ceiling is unconstitutional, how the government is legally committed to paying its debts. She points out the contradiction that has been for more than 100 years, since WWI. The easing put into place at that time was only to be a temporary measure.

Ellen also talks about shadow banking causing the crisis by money being lent into existence, slight of hand. The only real money are coins, which are one-tenth of the total money in circulation. Ellen also discusses QE2 , where the government agreed to pay the interest on borrowed money in order to maintain control of the Federal Funds rate. She said there are a lot of reserve funds on the books in certain foreign banks, including bond dealers, that is just being held.  Ellen also touches on the national debt, Glass-Steagall, and proposes state-owned banks as part of the solution, with the basic idea that we take care of our own, much the same way that Japan is reliant on their own Central Bank.

Ellen Brown developed her research skills as an attorney practicing civil litigation in Los Angeles. In Web of Debt, her latest book, she turns those skills to an analysis of the Federal Reserve and "the money trust." She shows how this private cartel has usurped the power to create money from the people themselves, and how we the people can get it back. Brown developed an interest in the developing world and its problems while living abroad for eleven years in Kenya, Honduras, Guatemala and Nicaragua. She returned to practicing law when she was asked to join the legal team of a popular Tijuana healer with an innovative cancer therapy, who was targeted by the chemotherapy industry in the 1990s.

That experience produced her book Forbidden Medicine, which traces the suppression of natural health treatments to the same corrupting influences that have captured the money system. Brown's eleven books include the bestselling Nature's Pharmacy, co-authored with Dr. Lynne Walker, which has sold 285,000 copies.

Direct download: cw-242-EllenBrown.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 9:21am EST

Jason Hartman starts this episode with a discussion of incredible financing for foreign investors looking to buy American real estate, self-directed IRA investors and those who have exceeded the 10 property/10 mortgage Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac loan limits or have lower FICO scores.  

Here are some notes on the program with details explained in the show audio: 30% down, 70% LTV, fully amortized over 15 or 20 years with adjustable rates starting at only 5.5% or 5.75% and 2% adjustment caps every three or five years at one point or $1,000 loan fee. The index is Wall Street Journal (WSJ) prime rate + a 1% margin. Only available in Dallas Fort Worth market area.

We’re putting enough real estate and business brainpower in one room to make Donald Trump flinch. Enjoy this content-rich sampler of "Meet The Masters" our twice annual powerhouse educational event that can revolutionize how you think about money and wealth.

Listen in and it can make all the difference if you simply have the courage to take action on your dream. The reality is you can fire your boss and live life on your own terms sooner than you think.<strong> Wall Street Investing Does NOT Lead to Financial Freedom.

Direct download: cw-241-DallasFinancing.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 5:43pm EST

Join Jason Hartman and relationship expert, Gay Hendricks as they discuss relationships in the 21st Century, both personal and business. Gay says that in order to be a successful business person, you have to be a student of relationships, and for those who consult or do therapy or teach, you really need to be open to business.

As Gay teaches, you can never separate personal growth from business growth from financial growth. They are entwined. It starts with making a formal commitment to bringing the ideal relationships into your life. Gay also talks about his work with entrepreneurs, from getting focused on what you love to do and putting creative exhilaration in first place, from which you will figure out how to make what you do produce revenue. In addition, Jason and Gay discuss the definition of integrity, as well as the steps to becoming a person of integrity.

Gay Hendricks, Ph.D., has served for more than 35 years as one of the major contributors to the fields of relationship transformation and body-mind therapies. Along with his wife, Dr. Kathlyn Hendricks, Gay is the co-author of many bestsellers, including Conscious Loving and Five Wishes. He is the author of 33 books, including The Corporate Mystic, Conscious Living and The Big Leap. Dr. Hendricks received his Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Stanford in 1974.

After a twenty-one-year career as a professor of Counseling Psychology at University Colorado, he and Kathlyn founded The Hendricks Institute, which is based in Ojai, California and offers seminars worldwide. He is President of The Hendricks Institute. In recent years, he has also been active in creating new forms of conscious entertainment. In 2003, along with movie producer Stephen Simon, Dr. Hendricks founded The Spiritual Cinema Circle, which distributes inspirational movies to subscribers in 70+ countries around the world, www.SpiritualCinemaCircle.com. He has appeared on more than 500 radio and television shows, including OPRAH, CNN, CNBC, 48 HOURS and others.

Direct download: cw-240-GayHenricks.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 9:27am EST