Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Coming to us from London, Max Keiser joins Jason Hartman for a fast-paced interview about what is going on in our world with GDP, the debt ceiling and debt loads, gold and silver markets, and currency collapse.

Max is the host of “The Oracle with Max Keiser” for BBC World News and the author of the Keiser Report.  Jason and Max discuss how long the world governments can put off the inevitable collapse of the fiat money produced by the central banks. Max talks about the various currencies around the world and which countries are set to implode.  

Other topics that Max covers are countries that are losing their sovereignty, basically being held hostage and managed by entities outside of their own country, such as the IMF and Central Banks, how bonds play a role in this issue, and the edging toward a global tax. Max talks about the many ways that the world is being led into a globalized currency, which is not a theory, but happening in real time.

In addition to hosting the show and authoring the Kesier Report, Max is a blogger for the Huffington Post, and he has also presented features for the “People and Power” new magazine series on Aljazeera English. Max Keiser is the creator, co-founder and former CEO of HSX Holdings/Hollywood Stock Exchange, later sold to Cantor Fitzgerald.

He is also the co-founder of HSX films that went on to make almost a dozen films, including "Mixed Signals," "Six-String Samurai," "Dancer, Texas Pop. 81," and "girl." The company was then sold to Ignite Entertainment/Lionsgate. Max designed, scoped, and built the Hollywood Stock Exchange with Michael Burns. Max was awarded a US patent (number 5950176) for the 'Virtual Specialist Technology" on which the Hollywood Stock Exchange operates. He created virtual securities; MovieStocks, and StarBonds and created the first fully convertible virtual currency, the Hollywood Dollar. The Hollywood Stock Exchange remains the highest volume stock exchange in the world.

Direct download: cw-289-MaxKeiser.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 1:51pm EDT

On this episode, Jason Hartman interviews Dave Krieger, author of Clouded Titles, and an investigative journalist, for a fascinating look at the MERS mess, the foreclosure crisis, and get Dave’s outlook on things. Dave says there are an anticipated 4 million homes yet to go into foreclosure.

Dave explains some of the problems happening across the country with titles, defining “quiet title,” that he says homeowners tend to look at as a silver bullet to clear a title. He cautions these homeowners to seek legal counsel before considering this option. Dave also talks about the issues surrounding MERS (Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems) that have left many homeowners in trouble, and caused problems for title companies and investors. The biggest problems with this come when investors are trying to buy properties at foreclosure auction. Buried in the mortgage paperwork are statements that allow MERS to foreclose, leaving title companies to scramble to stop the action and coming up against clouded titles missing legal descriptions and other information, causing serious problems for investors.

Dave Krieger is a former major market radio news reporter and news director and television news reporter/anchorman and investigative journalist, who won national and state news awards from Associated Press Broadcasters. Dave was a former member of Radio and Television News Directors Association.

Dave began studying law in early 1990; specializing in real estate, tort, consumer credit and collection issues. His first self-published work, The Credit Restoration Primer, a 263-page, self-help, credit repair book, was first released in 1995 and is now entering its 4th Edition. Dave currently serves as a paralegal and legal research analyst for Wade Kricken, an attorney in Dallas, Texas, who specializes in consumer and real estate law and foreclosure defense.

Direct download: cw-288-DaveKrieger.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 9:25am EDT

Jason Hartman is joined by Larry Muck, the Executive Director of the American Association of Private Lenders, to talk about the AAPL’s history, mission and vision.  Larry explains what private lenders are doing for people that the banks can’t do, and how the AAPL is trying to organize the efforts of private lending.  

AAPL was formed to help raise the standards in the industry and develop a brand that could be used by private lenders to prove credibility and trust.  Larry also discusses the needs of investors and the various tools now available to support investors and lenders.

Larry shares his passion for fair dealing and excellence in lending as the Executive Director of the American Association of Private Lenders. He brings to this position the experiences gained through a 30 year career in banking.  

During that span, he served in many leadership and lending capacities, including serving as Executive Vice President for a regional bank with a $220 million portfolio of commercial, consumer, construction, and mortgage loans.  Additionally he served as Community President for Gold Bank in Saint Joseph, Missouri and transitioned to Regional EVP with Marshall and Ilsely Bank in Kansas City. His well rounded background includes experience in Loan Review and serving for two years as the Corporate Training Director for a $15B regional bank holding company.

Throughout his career, Larry has had a passion for community service, serving in various leadership capacities with organizations such as United Way, the Allied Arts Council, St. Joseph Preservation, Inc. and many others.  His interests lie in all outdoor sporting activities, basketball, and cooking.

His passion for music and serving Christ led him to serve as guitarist and backup vocalist for his church’s worship band for five years.  He received his secondary education through the University of Kansas, home of the fabulous KU Jayhawks Basketball team, and completed both his undergraduate and master degrees in Business Administration there.

Direct download: cw-287-LarryMuck.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 6:25pm EDT

CW 286: Deceptive Foreclosure Statistics with Sean O’Toole Founder of Foreclosure Radar

Tracking foreclosure stats and trends can be deceiving due to shadow inventory. Jason Hartman’s guest, Sean O’Toole, founder of Foreclosure Radar, explains the foreclosure rate, the “foreclosure hangover,” the slow increase in home prices, and much more.

Sean and Jason also talk about the price differences and inventory in the California markets, and the fallacy of a “Foreclosure Wave” in the nation, regardless of who is nominated in the Presidential election. Sean defines the judicial and non-judicial markets and all of the distractions that have slowed down our recovery. He defends the MERS system, despite its flaws, because our current system is completely broken.

Prior to launching ForeclosureRadar, Sean successfully purchased and flipped more than 150 residential and commercial foreclosures. Leveraging 15 years in the software industry, Sean used technology as a key competitive advantage to build his successful real estate investment track record. Sean has always thrived in startup environments, and as such, became a key contributor at Xing Technology (acquired by Real Networks), ISI/GlobalCenter (acquired by Global Crossing), and Icarian, Inc.(acquired by Workstream, Inc.).

With his extensive experience in computers, software development, and business processes, Sean moved easily into VP and Director level positions in engineering, product management, sales, marketing and operations. Sean also served as President of the OpenMPEG Consortium, which brought together 32 companies to define industry standards for video on personal computers.

Direct download: cw-286-SeanOToole.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 8:23am EDT

Jason Hartman and Karl Deninger, author of Leverage and his blog, “The Market Ticker,” get together to discuss the economic structural imbalances around the world. Karl started “The Market Ticker” to warn investors about impending ruptures in the stock market after he figured out the illegal methods happening in the tech boom and crash that left many of his friends bankrupt.

He stresses the importance of knowing how we got where we are today and offers solutions to actually put the system back together on a sustainable basis. In his book, Leverage, Larry explains the problem in that all geometric systems are unsustainable for the long term, such as Medicare/Medicaid, trade deficits, deflation from productivity, deflation of fiat money, and much more.

Mr. Denninger is the former CEO of MCSNet, a regional Chicago area networking and Internet company that operated from 1987 to 1998. MCSNet was proud to offer several "firsts" in the Internet Service space, including integral customer-specified spam filtering for all customers and the first virtual web server available to the general public.

Mr. Denninger's other accomplishments include the design and construction of regional and national IP-based networks and development of electronic conferencing software reaching back to the 1980s.He has been a full-time trader since 1998, author of The Market Ticker (, a daily market commentary, and operator of TickerForum, an online trading community, both since 2007.

Direct download: cw-285-KarlDenninger.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 8:10am EDT

Private equity is a type of investing where you deploy capital in companies privately rather than in the public market. Here to talk about this subject with Jason Hartman is David Carey, author of King of Capital, and senior writer for “The Deal.” David explains the various forms, including injecting money into companies to help them grow faster, and the most common form, a leverage buyout (LBO).

In an LBO, private equity firms are not responsible for paying down the debt, unlike a homeowner who pays off a mortgage. Instead, the company that is being acquired takes on the debt and retires it over time using its own cash flow. David notes that most private equity firms outperform stocks and bonds by a wide margin, not just through the use of leverage, but also from improving the profitability of the companies they acquire. David goes on to share his thoughts on the attacks on private equity, Bing Capital and Mitt Romney.

Dispelling the political negative caricature of the private equity business, David shares how these firms have helped numerous companies prosper, allowing for quicker new job growth. Bing Capital was an exception, having piled on too much debt, and naturally, the Obama campaign took a potshot at the firm and private equity firms in general.

DAVID CAREY is senior writer for The Deal, a news service and magazine covering private-equity and mergers and acquisitions. Before joining The Deal, he was the editor of Corporate Finance magazine and wrote for Adweek, Fortune, Institutional Investor, and Financial World. Carey has appeared often on CNBC. He holds two masters degrees: one in French literature from Princeton and a second in journalism from Columbia. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Washington.

Direct download: cw-284-DavidCarey.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 2:36pm EDT

Between 1980 and 2000, the wealth of our nation grew enormously. Interest rates dropped, dot com businesses grew, and then the housing market was rocketing. We then went into a tricky period where overall net worth grew a bit until the dot com crash; the middle class was sustained to some degree by the housing boom, and then dropped sharply with the housing crash. Dr. H. Woody Brock, President and Founder of Strategic Economic Decisions and author of American Gridlock, joins Jason Hartman for an in-depth explanation of the financial health of our nation across social classes.

Dr. Brock discusses the nation overall and then breaks it down into the rich, the middle class, and the poor. The distribution of wealth have left the poor worse off and the rich very well off, as well as shrinking the middle class, but as Dr. Brock explains, looking at the distribution of consumption, the poor and middle classes are in a better position than when looking at the distribution of income.

Dr. Brock also expounds on QE3, the Federal Reserve actions, bank reserves, de-leveraging, and more. He wraps up on the subject of his book, American Gridlock: Why the Right and Left are Both Wrong.

Founder of Strategic Economic Decisions (SED), Inc., Dr. Horace “Woody” Brock specializes in applications of the modern Economics of Uncertainty (originally developed and championed by Kenneth J. Arrow of Stanford University) to forecasting and risk assessment in the international economy and its asset markets.

Holder of five academic degrees, Dr. Brock earned his B.A., M.B.A., and M.S. (mathematics) from Harvard University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University (mathematical economics and political philosophy). He was elected an Andrew Mellon Foundation Bicentennial Fellow of the Aspen Institute in 1976. Dr. Brock studied under Kenneth J. Arrow, Professor of Economics, and John C. Harsanyi, Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley, both winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics. Dr. Brock founded SED in 1985, and in doing so was sponsored by Fidelity, GE Capital, IBM Pension Fund, and twenty other institutions looking for a much deeper level of analysis of interest rates and the economy.

In its research, SED has focused on apprehending ongoing structural changes in the economy and markets to help clients avoid the pitfalls of illegitimately extrapolating the past into the future. In this regard, Dr. Brock has worked closely with Professor Mordecai Kurz of Stanford University in developing the new theory of Rational Beliefs that is now replacing the classical theory of “Efficient Markets”. This new theory explains for the first time the way in which history rhymes but does not repeat itself.

Direct download: cw-283-WoodyBrock.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 8:27am EDT

Jason talks briefly about some upcoming events and Creating Wealth shows.

Direct download: cw-announcements.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 7:59am EDT

With the November Presidential election right around the corner, nothing could be more timely or more important than understanding the electronic voting system and the risk to our right for a fair and honest voting system. Jason Hartman interviews Black Box Voting founder, Bev Harris, who was featured in the HBO documentary, “Hacking Democracy,” and has been researching and writing on the subject of electronic voting since 2002 after she discovered that U.S. Senator Chuck Hagel had ownership in and had been CEO of the company that built the machines which counted his own votes.

Bev shares the seriousness of the situation, explaining that the monopoly on the manufacturing of the machines gives the corporate owners (shareholders) complete control over voting outcomes, and that the structural problems with electronic voting prevent the public from being able to authenticate.

Vanity Fair magazine credits Bev Harris with founding the movement to reform electronic voting. Time Magazine calls her book, Black Box Voting, "the bible" of electronic voting. The Boston Globe has referred to her as "the godmother" of the election reform movement. Her articles were among the first to reveal that modern-day voting systems are run by private for-profit corporations, relying on a few cronies for oversight, using a certification system so fundamentally flawed that it allows machines to miscount and lose votes, with hidden back doors that enable "end runs" around the voting system.

Bev’s investigations have led some to call her the "Erin Brockovich of elections." ( In 2003, just weeks after a stunning electoral upset in Georgia that tipped control of the U.S. Senate, she discovered 40,000 secret voting machine files -- including a set of files called "rob-georgia," containing instructions to replace Georgia's computerized voting files before the election.

The files she found contained databases with votes in them and the voting machine programs themselves. She downloaded the files on Jan. 23, 2003 and set them free on the Internet a few months later, where they were studied by scientists and security experts.

Direct download: cw-282-BevHarris.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 3:26pm EDT

Jason Hartman has his mom back on the show to discuss her DIY property management/self-management strategies and one of her tenants who has occupying a property for 23 years - no vacancy! Then Jason interviews his Birmingham, Alabama Local Market Specialist (LMS) and talks to a caller/listener with some good real estate investing questions.

Here's an excerpt from Wikipedia on this market:

Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama. The city is the county seat of Jefferson County. The city's population was 212,237 according to the 2010 United States Census. The Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Area had a population of about 1,128,047 according to the 2010 Census, which is approximately one-quarter of Alabama's population. Birmingham was founded in 1871, during the post-Civil War Reconstruction period, through the merger of three pre-existing farm towns, notably, former Elyton.

It grew from there, annexing many more of its smaller neighbors, into an industrial and railroad transportation center with a focus on mining, the iron and steel industry, and railroading. Birmingham was named for Birmingham, one of the major industrial cities of the United Kingdom. Many, if not most, of the original settlers who founded Birmingham were of English ancestry. In one writer's view, the city was planned as a place where cheap, non-unionized, and African-American labor from rural Alabama could be employed in the city's steel mills and blast furnaces, giving it a competitive advantage over industrial cities in the Midwest and Northeast.

From its founding through the end of the 1960s, Birmingham was a primary industrial center of the South. The pace of Birmingham's growth during the period from 1881 through 1920 earned its nicknames The Magic City andThe Pittsburgh of the South. Much like Pittsburgh, Birmingham's major industries were iron and steel production, plus a major component of the railroading industry, where rails and railroad cars were both manufactured in Birmingham. In the field of railroading, the two primary hubs of railroading in the Deep South were nearby Atlanta and Birmingham, beginning in the 1860s and continuing through to the present day. The economy diversified during the later half of the twentieth century. Though the manufacturing industry maintains a strong presence in Birmingham, other businesses and industries such as banking, telecommunications, transportation, electrical power transmission, medical care, college education, and insurance have risen in stature.

Mining in the Birmingham area is no longer a major industry with the exception of coal mining. Birmingham ranks as one of the most important business centers in the Southeastern United States and is also one of the largest banking centers in the United States. In addition, the Birmingham area serves as headquarters to one Fortune 500 company:Regions Financial.

Five Fortune 1000 companies are headquartered in Birmingham. In the field of college and university education, Birmingham has been the location of the University of Alabama School of Medicine (formerly known as the Medical College of Alabama) and the University of Alabama School of Dentistry since 1947, and since that time, it has also become provided with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (founded circa 1969), one of three main campuses of the University of Alabama, and also with the private Birmingham-Southern College.

Between these two universities and Samford University, the Birmingham area has major colleges of medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, law, engineering, and nursing. Birmingham is home to three of the state's five law schools: Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham School of Law, and Miles Law School. Birmingham is also the headquarters of the Southeastern Conference, one of the major U.S. collegiate athletic conferences.

Direct download: cw-281-Birmingham.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 5:08pm EDT